Tunisia


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Tunisia Human Rights

After legislative and presidential elections in October 2019, a new coalition government headed by Elyes Fakhfakh took office on 27 February. Following allegations of corruption, Elyes Fakhfakh resigned on 15 July. President Kaïs Saïed tasked former Minister of Interior Hichem Mechichi to form a new government, which took office on 2 September.

The country was put under a general lockdown from 22 March to 4 May 2020 to control the spread of COVID-19. The government allocated TND450 million (US$155 million) in aid for poor families and people who had lost their income due to the pandemic and adopted other measures to support businesses and low-income workers. Restrictive measures due to the pandemic continue to remain in place, including a curfew.

Protests continued over the lack of employment opportunities, poor living conditions, and water shortages, particularly in marginalized and underdeveloped regions. People financially impacted by the COVID-19 crisis protested in several governorates, accusing local authorities of corruption and demanding increases and a more transparent distribution of government aid. Protests were staged against insufficient government protection of health workers during the pandemic.

The Constitutional Court, which was due to be set up in 2015, was still not established as Parliament once again failed to elect the first third of the Court’s members.

The authorities have renewed four times the nationwide state of emergency (continuously in place since November 2015).

The government published in the official gazette the final report of the Truth and Dignity Commission, and trials continued before specialized criminal chambers of people accused of human rights violations committed between 1956 and 2013.

Bloggers and social media users continue to be investigated or prosecuted for the peaceful online expression of their views, including for criticizing the government’s approach to dealing with COVID-19. Refugees and asylum-seekers continue to be detained for irregular entry into Tunisia. Arbitrary detention of undocumented migrants in reception centers continues. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) people continue to be arrested and detained for consensual same-sex sexual relations.

Tunisia Newsroom



February 1, 2021 • Press Release

Fresh Evidence of Police Misuse of Tear Gas Leading to Protesters’ Deaths and Injuries – Updated Investigative Website

Amnesty International today published new evidence of the misuse of tear gas by security forces in several countries in the second half of 2020, including during protests around the election in Uganda, the Black Lives Matter movement in the USA, and in the repression of protesters in Lebanon.

April 2, 2020 • Press Release

Authorities in Tunisia Should Reduce Number of Detainees During COVID-19 Crisis

The Tunisian authorities must urgently consider reducing the number of people detained for breaching emergency health measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19, Amnesty International warned today.

December 9, 2019 • Press Release

Generation Z Ranks Climate Change Highest as Vital Issue of our Time in Amnesty International Survey

Climate change leads as one of the most important issues facing the world, according to a major new survey of young people published by Amnesty International today to mark Human Rights Day.

February 26, 2019 • Report

Human rights in the Middle East and North Africa: A review of 2018

The international community’s chilling complacency towards wide-scale human rights violations in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) has emboldened governments to commit appalling violations during 2018 by giving them …

October 24, 2018 • Report

Tunisia: Arbitrary and abusive travel restrictions breach human rights

Travel restrictions introduced by the Tunisian authorities in the name of security are being imposed in an often arbitrary, sweeping and discriminatory manner flouting basic human rights, said Amnesty International …

March 17, 2016 • Press Release

Tunisia: Severe restrictions on liberty and movement latest symptoms of repressive emergency law

As Tunisia prepares to extend a nationwide state of emergency on 22 March, Amnesty International has highlighted the government’s disproportionate and repressive use of emergency laws to trample on human rights.

February 22, 2016 • Press Release

Amnesty International’s Annual State of the World Report Slams Governments, Including the U.S., for Global Assault on Freedoms

On the launch of its 2015 State of the World report, Amnesty International USA urged President Obama to use his last year in office to bring U.S. laws and policies in line with international human rights standards.

February 18, 2016 • Report

Amnesty International State of the World 2015-2016

International protection of human rights is in danger of unravelling as short-term national self-interest and draconian security crackdowns have led to a wholesale assault on basic freedoms and rights, warned Amnesty International as it launched its annual assessment of human rights around the world. “Your rights are in jeopardy: they are being treated with utter contempt by many governments around the world,” said Salil Shetty, Secretary General of Amnesty International.

February 18, 2016 • Press Release

Your rights in jeopardy, global assault on freedoms, warns Amnesty International

International protection of human rights is in danger of unravelling as short-term national self-interest and draconian security crackdowns have led to a wholesale assault on basic freedoms and rights, warned Amnesty International as it launched its annual assessment of human rights around the world. “Your rights are in jeopardy: they are being treated with utter contempt by many governments around the world,” said Salil Shetty, Secretary General of Amnesty International.

January 13, 2016 • Press Release

Evidence of torture and deaths in custody in Tunisia suggest human rights gains of the uprising are sliding into reverse gear

New evidence of deaths in custody and torture collected by Amnesty International suggests that brutal repression is on the rise again in Tunisia exactly five years after the toppling of the previous authoritarian regime by the “Jasmine Revolution”, which sparked a wave of uprisings across the Middle East and North Africa.