Senegal


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Senegal Human Rights

Background

A resumption of sporadic attacks against military targets by people alleged to belong to the Democratic Forces of Casamance Movement (Mouvement des forces démocratiques de Casamance, MFDC) undermined the fragile status quo in southern Casamance reached after the 2004 peace agreement. In September and October, several soldiers were killed. In response, the Senegalese air force bombed areas thought to include MFDC bases.

In March, an opposition coalition won local elections against a background of protests against rising food prices, shortages of key commodities and power cuts.

Internally Displaced People

The resumption of intermittent hostilities in Casamance led to the displacement of hundreds of people from their homes in the outskirts of Ziguinchor, the main city in Casamance. Some people fled areas that were bombed by Senegalese military airplanes. Others, notably around Baraf village near Ziguinchor, were forcibly expelled from their homes by alleged members of the MFDC and forbidden from returning to cultivate their fields.

Freedom Of Expression

Independent media and journalists were targeted in an attempt to stifle freedom of expression and criticism of President Abdoulaye Wade and his government.

  • In March, three community radio stations in Dakar were suspended for two months for commenting on the local elections. The authorities withdrew the suspension after four days on condition that the stations stopped commenting on political issues during election campaigns.
  • In August, three journalists with Le Quotidien newspaper were summoned by police for interrogation for two days after publishing an article criticizing President Wade and government ministers.
Senegal Newsroom



February 22, 2016 • Press Release

Amnesty International’s Annual State of the World Report Slams Governments, Including the U.S., for Global Assault on Freedoms

On the launch of its 2015 State of the World report, Amnesty International USA urged President Obama to use his last year in office to bring U.S. laws and policies in line with international human rights standards.

February 18, 2016 • Report

Amnesty International State of the World 2015-2016

International protection of human rights is in danger of unravelling as short-term national self-interest and draconian security crackdowns have led to a wholesale assault on basic freedoms and rights, warned Amnesty International as it launched its annual assessment of human rights around the world. “Your rights are in jeopardy: they are being treated with utter contempt by many governments around the world,” said Salil Shetty, Secretary General of Amnesty International.

February 18, 2016 • Press Release

Your rights in jeopardy, global assault on freedoms, warns Amnesty International

International protection of human rights is in danger of unravelling as short-term national self-interest and draconian security crackdowns have led to a wholesale assault on basic freedoms and rights, warned Amnesty International as it launched its annual assessment of human rights around the world. “Your rights are in jeopardy: they are being treated with utter contempt by many governments around the world,” said Salil Shetty, Secretary General of Amnesty International.

February 25, 2015 • Report

State of the World 2014/2015

This has been a devastating year for those seeking to stand up for human rights and for those caught up in the suffering of war zones. Governments pay lip service to the importance of protecting civilians. And yet the world's politicians have miserably failed to protect those in greatest need. Amnesty International believes that this can and must finally change.

June 26, 2013 • Press Release

President Obama Must Use Africa Trip to Push Leaders to Protect Human Rights

On the eve of President Obama’s trip this week to Senegal, South Africa and Tanzania, Amnesty International USA is urging the president to demand greater respect for and protection of human rights across the African continent

June 24, 2013 • Press Release

On Eve of Obama Trip, New Report Finds Dangerously Rising Levels of Homophobia in Africa

Attacks, threats, and harassment of gays and lesbians are becoming more visible across sub-Saharan Africa, indicating that homophobia is reaching dangerous levels, Amnesty International said today in a new report documenting violence and discrimination against LGBTI individuals on the continent.

May 23, 2013 • Report

Annual Report: Senegal 2013

REPUBLIC OF SENEGAL Head of state Macky Sall (replaced Abdoulaye Wade) Head of government Abdoul Mbaye (replaced Souleymane Ndéné Ndiaye) The unrest which marked the pre-election period in January and February resulted in serious human rights violations, including excessive use of force leading to the death of several protesters; torture and other ill-treatment; and attacks …

July 20, 2012 • Press Release

Senegal Must Comply With Court Ruling on Former Chad President

The International Court of Justice today told Senagal it must comply with its ruling to prosecute former Chad president Habré, accused of crimes against humanity.

February 1, 2012 • Press Release

As Police Vehicle Kills Protester in Escalating Protests in Senegal, Amnesty International Urges President Wade to Rein in Security Forces

Amnesty International urged Senegalese President Abdoulaye Wade to rein in security forces after a third person was killed and dozens injured by police during two days of demonstrations across the country. Eyewitnesses told Amnesty International that police fired on demonstrators and threw a tear gas canister at an ambulance.

January 30, 2012 • Press Release

Amnesty International Urges Senegal to Stop Clampdown on Dissent as Protesters Shot Dead

Senegal’s security forces must stop their violent clampdown on dissent, Amnesty International said today after two people were killed during protests in the city of Podor.