Mongolia


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Mongolia Human Rights

Law enforcement officials continued to commit human rights abuses with impunity. Authorities failed to prevent, investigate and punish attacks against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people including attacks by law enforcement officials. Information on the use of the death penalty remained a state secret.

Allegations of law enforcement officials committing torture and other ill-treatment were frequently dismissed by the State General Prosecutor’s Office with no or inadequate investigation.

In July, the Parliament passed an Amnesty Law which led to over 2,192 people being released for minor crimes and misdemeanours committed before 24 June 2009. Those released included people being detained for alleged crimes committed during the July 2008 riot.

An investigation by the Special Investigation Unit into the case of four senior police officials suspected of authorizing and distributing live ammunition and 10 police officers suspected of using live ammunition in July 2008 was completed on 15 February. Further procedures to initiate prosecution were stalled until November because the defendants and their lawyers did not return the case files to the Special Investigation Unit. It was unclear how the Amnesty Law would impact on the prosecutions.

Death Penalty

All aspects of the death penalty are considered a state secret. The families and lawyers of those on death row received no prior notification of execution and the bodies of those executed were never returned to their families.

Mongolia Newsroom



February 22, 2016 • Press Release

Amnesty International’s Annual State of the World Report Slams Governments, Including the U.S., for Global Assault on Freedoms

On the launch of its 2015 State of the World report, Amnesty International USA urged President Obama to use his last year in office to bring U.S. laws and policies in line with international human rights standards.

February 18, 2016 • Press Release

Your rights in jeopardy, global assault on freedoms, warns Amnesty International

International protection of human rights is in danger of unravelling as short-term national self-interest and draconian security crackdowns have led to a wholesale assault on basic freedoms and rights, warned Amnesty International as it launched its annual assessment of human rights around the world. “Your rights are in jeopardy: they are being treated with utter contempt by many governments around the world,” said Salil Shetty, Secretary General of Amnesty International.

February 18, 2016 • Report

Amnesty International State of the World 2015-2016

International protection of human rights is in danger of unravelling as short-term national self-interest and draconian security crackdowns have led to a wholesale assault on basic freedoms and rights, warned Amnesty International as it launched its annual assessment of human rights around the world. “Your rights are in jeopardy: they are being treated with utter contempt by many governments around the world,” said Salil Shetty, Secretary General of Amnesty International.

February 25, 2015 • Report

State of the World 2014/2015

This has been a devastating year for those seeking to stand up for human rights and for those caught up in the suffering of war zones. Governments pay lip service to the importance of protecting civilians. And yet the world's politicians have miserably failed to protect those in greatest need. Amnesty International believes that this can and must finally change.

May 21, 2013 • Report

Annual Report: Mongolia 2013

Mongolia Head of state Tsakhia Elbegdorj Head of government Norovyn Altankhuyag (replaced Sükhbaataryn Batbold) Mongolia took one step closer to abolishing the death penalty by acceding to the Second Optional Protocol to the ICCPR. Trials of high-profile individuals, including political figures, failed to meet international standards of fairness. Lack of due process led to forced …

January 5, 2012 • Press Release

Amnesty International Welcomes Mongolia’s “Vital Step” Toward Abolishing Death Penalty, as a Model for Other Countries in the Asia-Pacific Region

Amnesty International USA said today Mongolia's "vital step" toward abolishing the death penalty should serve as a model for other countries in the region and elsewhere, including the United States, to end the ultimate cruel and degrading punishment.

March 19, 2011 • Report

Annual Report: Mongolia 2010

Head of state Tsakhia Elbegdorj (replaced Nambaryn Enkhbayar in June) Head of government Batbold Sukhbaatar (replaced Sanjaagiin Bayar in October) Death penalty Retentionist Population 2.7 million Life expectancy 66.2 years Under-5 mortality (m/f) 49/40 per 1,000 Adult literacy 97.3 per cent Law enforcement officials continued to commit human rights abuses with impunity. Authorities failed to …