Liberia


Share
Share

Liberia Human Rights

President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf signed into law an Act that reintroduced the death penalty, which was in contravention of Liberia’s obligation under the Second Optional Protocol of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, aiming at the abolition of the death penalty, to which Liberia acceded in 2005.

Rape and other forms of sexual violence remain among the most frequently committed crimes. Further, spousal rape is not criminalized.

There were however some positive developments in addressing rape and other forms of sexual violence. The government did establish a special court dedicated to hearing gender and sexual violence cases. Further a safe house for survivors of sexual violence, supported by UN Mission in Liberia (UNMIL) and run by a local NGO, opened in Monrovia.

Crimes against children, including rape, sexual violence, physical violence, trafficking and neglect remain of serious concern.

Access to health facilities to address emergency needs and psychological care continue to be inadequate.

A national action plan on gender-based violence has been adopted in Liberia. The UN provided funds to implement the plan. Liberia also ratified the Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa.

The justice sector continues to suffer from a shortage of qualified judges, lack of infrastructure, archaic rules of procedure, and too few legal officers. This situation has led to due process denials and lengthy pretrial detentions. Only one public defender was deployed in the entire country.

The problems in the judicial system resulted in overcrowding at Monrovia Central Prison. Overwhelming majority of those detained in Monrovia Central Prison were held without charge, some for as long as two years.

The 2003 Accra Peace Agreement, which brought Liberia’s years of armed conflict to an end, called upon the Liberian government to create an Independent National Human Rights Commission, and in 2005, the Independent National Commission on Human Rights Act was passed into law. Five years later, the government and parliament still have not established a human rights commission in Liberia.

Amnesty International believes that President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf must turn the promise of the Commission into tangible action since it is a moral imperative for the Liberian administration to ensure justice, accountability, and respect for the human rights of all Liberians.

While plans to establish the commission remain in limbo, the country has experienced ongoing violence and internecine conflict, striking deficiencies in judiciary, police, and corrections operations, vigilante justice, and high incidence of rape of women and girls. The Commission would be designed to address these problems and help reduce the incidence of human rights abuses.

Amnesty International believes that the Liberian government should make the establishment of such a commission a top priority. Furthermore, the government should ensure the success of the Commission by making public the official budget and time frame for vetting commissioners, by involving civil society in this process, and by ensuring transparency at all stages of the process.

Liberia Newsroom



February 22, 2016 • Press Release

Amnesty International’s Annual State of the World Report Slams Governments, Including the U.S., for Global Assault on Freedoms

On the launch of its 2015 State of the World report, Amnesty International USA urged President Obama to use his last year in office to bring U.S. laws and policies in line with international human rights standards.

February 18, 2016 • Press Release

Your rights in jeopardy, global assault on freedoms, warns Amnesty International

International protection of human rights is in danger of unravelling as short-term national self-interest and draconian security crackdowns have led to a wholesale assault on basic freedoms and rights, warned Amnesty International as it launched its annual assessment of human rights around the world. “Your rights are in jeopardy: they are being treated with utter contempt by many governments around the world,” said Salil Shetty, Secretary General of Amnesty International.

February 18, 2016 • Report

Amnesty International State of the World 2015-2016

International protection of human rights is in danger of unravelling as short-term national self-interest and draconian security crackdowns have led to a wholesale assault on basic freedoms and rights, warned Amnesty International as it launched its annual assessment of human rights around the world. “Your rights are in jeopardy: they are being treated with utter contempt by many governments around the world,” said Salil Shetty, Secretary General of Amnesty International.

February 25, 2015 • Report

State of the World 2014/2015

This has been a devastating year for those seeking to stand up for human rights and for those caught up in the suffering of war zones. Governments pay lip service to the importance of protecting civilians. And yet the world's politicians have miserably failed to protect those in greatest need. Amnesty International believes that this can and must finally change.

May 21, 2013 • Report

Annual Report: Liberia 2013

Republic of Liberia Head of state and government Ellen Johnson Sirleaf The justice system continued to be inefficient. Access to prisons was restricted and discrimination continued against women and LGBTI people. Forty-one people were extradited to Côte d'Ivoire without due process. Background Former Liberian President Charles Taylor was found guilty by the Special Court of …

May 30, 2012 • Press Release

Taylor Sentencing Only a Step Toward Justice; More People Should be Prosecuted and Reparations Paid to Victims

As Charles Taylor is sentenced to 50 years, a climate of impunity hangs over Liberia, while victims of heinous crimes in Sierra Leone continue to lack accountability and justice.

September 20, 2011 • Report

Appalling prison conditions in Liberia must be improved

Liberia’s government, still struggling to rebuild the country after a 14-year internal armed conflict, has stated its determination to improve the prison system. However, conditions in Liberia’s prisons are so poor that they violate basic human rights. Prison inmates are crowded into dark, dirty cells, without adequate food, sanitation or health care. Some suffer permanent damage to their physical or mental health as a result. Most have not been convicted of any crime. The vast majority are people living in poverty, without access to lawyers and with few financial resources.

June 28, 2011 • Report

Annual Report: Liberia 2011

Head of state and government: Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf Death penalty: abolitionist in practice Population: 4.1 million Life expectancy: 59.1 years Under-5 mortality (m/f): 144/136 per 1,000 Adult literacy: 58.1 per cent Although the government made some institutional progress towards improving the human rights situation, levels of violent crime, including rape and other forms of sexual violence …

March 27, 2011 • Press Release

Liberia: President Obama Should Pressure Liberia to Establish Human Rights Commission

Amnesty International USA calls on the Obama Administration to take the opportunity during Thursday?s meeting with Liberia?s...

March 27, 2011 • Press Release

Liberia: President Obama Should Pressure Liberia to Establish Human Rights Commission

Amnesty International USA calls on the Obama Administration to take the opportunity during Thursday?s meeting with Liberia?s...