Guinea


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Guinea Human Rights

President Lansana Conté, who had ruled Guinea for more than 24 years, died on December 22nd, 2008. Immediately after his death, a military junta led by Captain Moussa Dadis Camara seized power, promising to hold presidential elections in early 2010. Camara also promised at the time that he would not run for election. However, Camara soon broke his promise and in August 2009 suggested that he may run for the presidency after all.

On September 28th, 2009, security forces opened fire on several thousand demonstrators who had assembled in a Conakry stadium to show their opposition to Camara's candidacy in the presidential elections. The Guinean security forces not only used live ammunition on the demonstrators, but also shot unarmed protestors with the intent to kill. Witnesses also told Amnesty International that several women were stripped naked and publicly raped by soldiers, and that soldiers used bayonets and daggers to kill civilians. The Guinean government claims that only 58 people were killed that day but human rights organizations report that upwards of 157 people may have died.

In response to this tragedy, Amnesty International called all states to suspend international supplies of military and police weaponry, munitions and other equipment that could be used to commit human rights violations by Guinean security forces. Amnesty also called for an international commission of inquiry to investigate the events of September 28th.

 

Guinea's Bloody Monday – The Case for an International Arms Trade Treaty

Despite a clear pattern of violence and human rights violations committed by Guinean security forces in recent years, a number of governments, including the US, France and China, and companies have continued to authorize, finance and organize the supply of military and security equipment, training and other assistance to Guinean security forces. The decade-long failure of states to adequately assess the risk that each of their exports of arms and training to Guinean could facilitate serious human rights violations is s testimony to the urgent need for all states to adopt international standards to assess arms transfers on a case-by-case basis against international humanitarian and human rights law. This should be enshrined in an objective, non-discriminatory way in the Arms Trade Treaty which the UN General Assembly has agreed should now be negotiated.

An Amnesty International delegation to Guinea in November 2009 found that over 40 people who had attended the rally were still missing. This includes dead bodies that were identified in photographs and film footage taken at the stadium but were not subsequently found at any of Conakry's hospitals, morgues, mosques or military camps, including Camp Alpha Yaya Diallo. The whereabouts of others who attended the rally is now unknown. Amnesty International fears that they may have been killed or subjected to enforced disappearance.

As of December 2009, the situation in Guinea continues to unravel, as insecurity remains prevalent and the military continues to commit human rights abuses. Guinea's security forces are continuing to arrest and harass activists and others who do not support the military junta, including Mouctar Diallo, vice-president of Guinea's national human rights commission, who was arrested on 26 November. Amnesty International discovered that Diallo is being detained in military Camp Alpha Yaya, for "endangering the security of the state".

On December 3rd, 2009, members of the Presidential Guard attempted to assassinate Captain Camara, who has since then been flown to a hospital in Rabat, Morocco to be treated for a head wound. The junta claims Camara is alive and well, but the political opposition is demanding more details regarding his health.

Guinea Newsroom



October 7, 2016 • Press Release

Guinea: One Year On, No Justice for Election Violence

Authorities in Guinea should take concrete and immediate steps to ensure justice for the victims and the families of those who were shot, raped, or beaten to death during the 2015 presidential election period, Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch said today in a joint letter to President Alpha Condé. Guinea’s authorities should ensure that …

July 5, 2016 • Press Release

Guinea: New criminal code drops death penalty but fails to tackle impunity and keeps repressive provisions

Guinea’s National Assembly vote in favor of a new criminal code abolishing the death penalty is a significant step for human rights in the country, but the code contains provisions which will strengthen the impunity enjoyed by security personnel and repress the expression of dissent, Amnesty International said.

February 22, 2016 • Press Release

Amnesty International’s Annual State of the World Report Slams Governments, Including the U.S., for Global Assault on Freedoms

On the launch of its 2015 State of the World report, Amnesty International USA urged President Obama to use his last year in office to bring U.S. laws and policies in line with international human rights standards.

February 18, 2016 • Report

Amnesty International State of the World 2015-2016

International protection of human rights is in danger of unravelling as short-term national self-interest and draconian security crackdowns have led to a wholesale assault on basic freedoms and rights, warned Amnesty International as it launched its annual assessment of human rights around the world. “Your rights are in jeopardy: they are being treated with utter contempt by many governments around the world,” said Salil Shetty, Secretary General of Amnesty International.

February 18, 2016 • Press Release

Your rights in jeopardy, global assault on freedoms, warns Amnesty International

International protection of human rights is in danger of unravelling as short-term national self-interest and draconian security crackdowns have led to a wholesale assault on basic freedoms and rights, warned Amnesty International as it launched its annual assessment of human rights around the world. “Your rights are in jeopardy: they are being treated with utter contempt by many governments around the world,” said Salil Shetty, Secretary General of Amnesty International.

February 25, 2015 • Report

State of the World 2014/2015

This has been a devastating year for those seeking to stand up for human rights and for those caught up in the suffering of war zones. Governments pay lip service to the importance of protecting civilians. And yet the world's politicians have miserably failed to protect those in greatest need. Amnesty International believes that this can and must finally change.

May 20, 2013 • Report

Annual Report: Guinea 2013

Republic of Guinea Head of state Alpha Condé Head of government Mohamed Saïd Fofana Legislative elections due to be held in 2012 were postponed until 2013. Human rights violations committed by the security forces included excessive use of force and extrajudicial killings, as well as torture and other ill-treatment. Freedom of assembly and expression remained …

September 28, 2011 • Press Release

Amnesty International Urges Guinea to Investigate Opposition Protest Deaths

The Guinean authorities must immediately carry out an investigation into the deaths of three protesters killed during clashes between police and demonstrators at a banned opposition rally in the capital Conakry on Tuesday, Amnesty International said today

March 19, 2011 • Report

Annual Report: Guinea 2010

Head of state Sékouba Konaté (replaced Moussa Dadis Camara in December) Head of government Kabiné Komara Death penalty retentionist Population 10.1 million Life expectancy 57.3 years Under-5 mortality (m/f) 157/138 per 1,000 Adult literacy 29.5 per cent Security forces extrajudicially executed more than 150 peaceful demonstrators and injured more than 1,500 others in a stadium …