Bolivia


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Bolivia Human Rights

Human Rights Concerns: Poverty, Corporate accountability, Right to organize

In 1985, Bolivia radically changed its economic policy by adopting the free trade model in an orthodox manner. Politically, in the year 2000, voices started to be heard both against the economic system and against the traditional system of political parties. The criticism against the economic model was based on the fact that promises of modernity and of a drastic reduction in poverty were never fulfilled. The loss of prestige in the political power was based on the feeling that all politicians had lost their role as representatives of the nation, and alternately focused themselves on trying to accumulate even more power.

This critical process reached its climax in the year 2003 when, following the decision of exporting gas to the United States of America through a Chilean harbor, the loss of prestige in the political class grew even further, because it was thought that politicians were selling the country's natural resources to foreigners to the total detriment of the energetic needs of Bolivian people.

Two months of protest, and around 81 deaths made President Gonzalo Sánchez de Lozada leave power in his second presidential term and flee to the United States of America. After Sánchez de Lozada resigned, vise-president Carlos Mesa assumed power. Mesa, despite having began his temporary presidential term with a high support from the people, resigned in July, 2005, after the impossibility of governing due to the continuous protests. After this situation, Eduardo Rodríguez Veltze, President of the Supreme Court, assumed power, and the Congress announced the anticipation of the presidential and parliamentary elections.

The elections have been set on the 4th of December; the main candidates are former President Jorge Quiroga, Samuel Doria Medina, businessman and former militant in the Left Wing Revolutionary Movement (MIR) and Evo Morales, native leader and cocalero leader.

Bolivia Newsroom



February 22, 2016 • Press Release

Amnesty International’s Annual State of the World Report Slams Governments, Including the U.S., for Global Assault on Freedoms

On the launch of its 2015 State of the World report, Amnesty International USA urged President Obama to use his last year in office to bring U.S. laws and policies in line with international human rights standards.

February 18, 2016 • Press Release

Your rights in jeopardy, global assault on freedoms, warns Amnesty International

International protection of human rights is in danger of unravelling as short-term national self-interest and draconian security crackdowns have led to a wholesale assault on basic freedoms and rights, warned Amnesty International as it launched its annual assessment of human rights around the world. “Your rights are in jeopardy: they are being treated with utter contempt by many governments around the world,” said Salil Shetty, Secretary General of Amnesty International.

February 18, 2016 • Report

Amnesty International State of the World 2015-2016

International protection of human rights is in danger of unravelling as short-term national self-interest and draconian security crackdowns have led to a wholesale assault on basic freedoms and rights, warned Amnesty International as it launched its annual assessment of human rights around the world. “Your rights are in jeopardy: they are being treated with utter contempt by many governments around the world,” said Salil Shetty, Secretary General of Amnesty International.

February 25, 2015 • Report

State of the World 2014/2015

This has been a devastating year for those seeking to stand up for human rights and for those caught up in the suffering of war zones. Governments pay lip service to the importance of protecting civilians. And yet the world's politicians have miserably failed to protect those in greatest need. Amnesty International believes that this can and must finally change.

May 16, 2013 • Report

Annual Report: Bolivia 2013

Head of state and government Evo Morales Ayma Indigenous Peoples’ rights to consultation and to free, prior and informed consent over developments affecting them remained unfulfilled. Victims of human rights violations committed during past military regimes continued to be denied full reparations. Delays in the administration of justice persisted. Violations of freedom of expression were …

August 31, 2011 • Press Release

Amnesty International Applauds Conviction of Former Officials in Bolivia Massacre

The conviction of seven high-ranking former officials in Bolivia for their role in dozens of deaths during anti-government protests in 2003 is an important step for justice, Amnesty International said today.

June 30, 2011 • Report

Annual Report: Bolivia 2011

Head of state and government: Evo Morales Ayma Death penalty: abolitionist for ordinary crimes Population: 10 million Life expectancy: 66.3 years Under-5 mortality (m/f): 65/56 per 1,000 Adult literacy: 90.7 per cent Institutional developments in the justice system gave rise to serious concerns. Key trials for past human rights violations and investigations into allegations of …

March 19, 2011 • Report

Annual Report: Bolivia 2010

Head of state and government Evo Morales Ayma Death penalty abolitionist for ordinary crimes Population 9.9 million Life expectancy 65.4 years Under-5 mortality (m/f) 65/56 per 1,000 Adult literacy 90.7 per cent A number of initiatives in the area of economic, social and cultural rights resulted in improvements in education and health services and in …