Uganda: Breaking the circle: Protecting human rights in the northern war zone

Report
March 16, 1999

Uganda: Breaking the circle: Protecting human rights in the northern war zone


(63) According to a UK Government study, 85% of criminal prosecutions in Ugandan courts are carried out by police officers (Uganda: Review of Uganda criminal justice system -- Final Report, p 13, Section Four, Volume I, Department for International Development, December 1997).
(64) The same, of course, applies to civilians on charges of murder, rape, defilement etc.
(65) Mr Richard Buteera, Director of Public Prosecutions, Kampala, 28 May 1998.
(66) Many are now likely to be in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) since the deployment of UPDFtroops in support of the Congolese armed opposition in August 1998.
(67) Mr Alphonse Owiny Dollo, Minister of State for the North, Kampala, 26 May 1998.
(68) Brigadier Edward Wamala Katumba, Commander 4th Division, Gulu, 21 May 1998.
(69) Lieutenant Shaban Bantazira, quoted in The Monitor, 28 May 1997.
(70) Mr Joseph Etima, Commissioner of Prisons, Kampala, 28 May 1998.
(71) Regional Commander of Prisons, Gulu, 26 May 1997; Mr Allan Okello, Officer-in-charge, Gulu Prison, 27 May 1997. These figures are of all prisoners, not just soldiers or those charged with political offences.
(72) For example, some countries, most notably South Africa, have made use of Truth Commissions in which persons are only given amnesty once they have confessed fully and publicly to all the human rights crimes for which they are responsible. In other countries, national or even international criminal prosecution has been the preferred mechanism.
(73) See pp 7-9 "Breaking God's commands: the destruction of childhood by the Lord's Resistance Army (AFR 59/01/97).
(74) As of January 1999, the UHRC has showed a willingness to address human rights violations by powerful state actors that provides encouragement to the community of Ugandan non-governmental organizations to do likewise.