October 11, 2017

Urgent Action Update: Bill Leading To Military Impunity Approved (Brazil: UA 236.17)


The Brazilian Senate has approved a proposed bill which will transfer to the Military Court the ability to try human rights violations, such as killings and extrajudicial executions, which have been carried out by military personnel against civilians. This contradicts the fundamental principles of fair trial, judicial independence and impartiality of the decisions. It is now up to the President of Brazil to fully veto or sign the Bill into law.

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The Brazilian Senate has approved a proposed bill which will transfer to the Military Court the ability to try human rights violations, such as killings and extrajudicial executions, which have been carried out by military personnel against civilians. This contradicts the fundamental principles of fair trial, judicial independence and impartiality of the decisions. It is now up to the President of Brazil to fully veto or sign the Bill into law.

1) TAKE ACTION
Write a letter, send an email, call, fax or tweet:

  • Urging the Brazilian Senate to reject Bill No. 44/2016 that transfers the power to try crimes, including killings, committed by the military against civilians to the Military Court;

Contact these two officials by 20 October, 2017:

President of Brazil
Michel Temer
Palácio do Planalto
Praça Dos Três Poderes
Brasília – DF 70100-000, Brasil
Telephone: +55 61 3411 1200
Email: [email protected]
Facebook: www.facebook.com/palaciodoplanalto/www.facebook.com/MichelTemer/
Twitter: @micheltemer  @planalto
Salutation: Dear Mr. President

Ambassador Sergio Silva do Amaral
Embassy of Brazil
3006 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington DC 20008
Phone: 1 202 238 2700 I Fax: 1 202 238 2827
Twitter: @BrazilinUSA
Salutation: Dear Ambassador

2) LET US KNOW YOU TOOK ACTION
Click here to let us know if you took action on this case! This is Urgent Action 236.17
Here’s why it is so important to report your actions: we record the actions taken on each case—letters, emails, calls and tweets—and use that information in our advocacy.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES