Indonesia: Briefing to the UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women: Women and girl domestic workers

Report
January 1, 2011

Indonesia: Briefing to the UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women: Women and girl domestic workers

View More Research

(31) Employers must pay wages in accordance with the work contract and on a monthly basis; grant adequate breaks; provide adequate time to conduct acts of devotion in accordance with their religion and other beliefs; provide due protection to ensure adequate health and welfare conditions in the workplace; provide halal and nutritious food; provide minimum facilities including clothes, and a place to sleep; and not make domestic workers conduct work which may be harmful.

 

(32) A written contract must include the identity of both parties, their rights and duties, the type of work which will be conducted by the domestic worker, the working conditions (breaks etc), working hours, religious aspects, health and welfare protection, dispute resolution mechanisms, place and date of the agreement and signature of both parties.

 

(33) See ILO, The Regulation of Domestic Workers in Indonesia: Current Laws, International Standards and Best Practice, June 2006, Chapters 3 and 4.

 

(34) It is unclear from the report whether almost two thirds of those who took part in this survey went through an unwanted pregnancy or whether 61% of those who fell pregnant did not want to be.

 

(35) Combined fourth and fifth periodic reports of State parties to CEDAW: Indonesia, UN Doc. CEDAW/C/IDN/4-5, 27 July 2005, para 131.

 

(36) Under section 348 of the Criminal Code, any person performing an abortion is subject to imprisonment for up to five and a half years. Under section 346, a woman wilfully inducing her own miscarriage is subject to imprisonment for up to four years. See UN Population Division, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, ‘Abortion Policies: A Global Review 2002’, www.un.org/esa/population/publications/abortion/index.htm.

 

(37) See Indonesia’s report CEDAW/C/IDN/4-5, for example paras 130, 135, and 124.

 

(38) Ibid, paras. 129, 135 and 139.