USA: "Not part of my sentence": Violations of the human rights of women in custody

Report
February 28, 1999

USA: "Not part of my sentence": Violations of the human rights of women in custody

View More Research


(18) M Vaughn and L Smith, "Practising Penal Harm Medicine in the United States: Prisoner Voices from Jail,"Justice Quarterly, 16(1), forthcoming, 1999.
(19) L LaFay,The Virginian-Pilot, January 26, 1998.
(20) "Abysmal medical care reported by women at Goochland", press release from ACLU National Prison Project, January 21, 1998, Washington DC.
(21) C Harlow, "Profile of Jail Inmates 1996," Bureau of Justice Statistics Special report, US Department of Justice, 1998.
(22) L Acoca, "Defusing the Time Bomb: Understanding and Meeting the Growing Health Care Needs of Incarcerated Women in America," Crime and Delinquency, Vol 44, No.1, January 1998.
(23) In a recent survey of prison authorities, 27 states reported that they charge inmates for some forms of medical attention: "Inmate Health Care, Part I," Corrections Compendium, October 1998.
(24) The account of Melody Bird's treatment is in M Petersen, "Managed Health Care in Prisons Gains Favor, but Draws Concern," New York Times, 26 December, 1996. See also, for example, "Death, Neglect and the Bottom Line," St Louis Post-Dispatch, 27 September, 1998, an investigation into Correctional Medical Services Inc, reportedly the largest private health care provider in US prisons and jails; "Suicide in Jail Leads County To Cancel Pact," New York Times, 20 June, 1996; A Lomax, "Managed Care Infects Prison Health Services," Prison Legal News, volume 8, Number 10, October 1997.
(25) T Kupers,Prison Madness - The Mental Health Crisis Behind Bars and What We Must Do About It, Josey Bass, California, 1999 (forthcoming), 132.
(26) C Harlow, "Profile of Jail Inmates 1996," US Department of Justice, Washington DC, 1998. In a 1996 survey of jail inmates, 48 percent of jailed women reported having been physically or sexually abused before they were incarcerated; 27 percent had been raped.
(27) K Auerhahn and E Leonard, "Docile Bodies? Chemical Restraints and the Female Inmate," Paper presented at the American Society of Criminology, Washington, DC, November 1998.
(28) Cassandra Shaylor, Memo to Radhika Coomaraswamy, UN Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women, May 18, 1998.
(29) Although the term "supermax" is not the official term given to all such units, it has become a generic term used by experts in the field (and by the National Institute of Corrections in a 1997 survey) to describe high security facilities designed to manage or control inmates classified as requiring (on security or disciplinary grounds) the maximum restrictive custody arrangements.
(30) HRC Comments of 6 April 1995, UN Doc CCPR/C/79/Add.50 and UN Doc. E/CN.4/1996/35
(31) The study was conducted by the Prisoners Rights Project at the Rocky Mountain Peace and Justice Center, Boulder, Colorado.
(32) In January 1999, after six years of housing women in CSP, the Department of Corrections transferred all female inmates to the Denver Women's Correctional Facility where they continue to be held in isolation.